Classics

Reviews of books in this genre:

Dune Messiah by

This is a short entry compared to the others in the trilogy. It also involves a lot more navel-gazing than the first. Gone are the battles, the fighting and the grand visions. They’re replaced with plots, intrigue and battles of conscience. Having created an empire, set a galaxy-wide jihad in motion and been deified by – Read the rest of this review

Letters to a Young Poet by

This is a collection of letters from Bohemian poet Rainer Maria Rilke to Franz Kappus, a 19-year-old officer cadet at military academy. The letters were sent between 1903 and 1908. Kappus was an aspiring poet and reached out to Rilke as he was a former cadet at the same academy. He was originally looking for – Read the rest of this review

Fahrenheit 451 by

This is one of those classics that you’re supposed to read, a dystopian vision of the future that sits in the pantheon containing¬†1984, Brave New World and Slaughterhouse 5. It certainly contains a bleak vision of the future. Originally published in 1953, it has predictions of the future that seem both insightful and naive. He’s – Read the rest of this review

Ringworld by

An alien recruits three fellow travellers, two human, to visit a newly discovered structure 200 light-years from Earth. The ringworld is vast, surrounding a star it has a surface area of roughly three million Earth-sized planets. Approaching it cautiously, wary of the powerful race it must have taken to build it, they get shot down – Read the rest of this review

The Insidious Dr. Fu-Manchu by

Technically, this was released as The Mystery of Dr. Fu-Manchu (although the hyphen was later dropped). The US market had the alternative title. Needless to say, the author was also known by another name (Sax being his pen name). It follows the tale of (Denis) Nayland Smith but is narrated by his friend Dr. Petrie – Read the rest of this review