The Power

by

Not sure where I got the recommendation for this, but it was the premise that intrigued me.

The story is told from the viewpoint of several different characters from totally different backgrounds, and they are constantly moving locations to add even more variety (it would have been interesting to see the changes within a specific community).

From a technical standpoint, there’s nothing to complain about — interesting and varied characters, a thought-provoking plot, and an interesting narrative.

As a thought exercise I feel it failed though. There seemed to be an assumption that men dominate the world (arguable) due to their (generally) superior size and strength and that removing, even reversing, that advantage would result in them becoming subservient and fearful. Or that women would, in only a handful of years, take on the worst traits of domination.

Things would change, absolutely — the removal of the physical threat against women would obviously be very beneficial — but gaining the sudden ability to zap someone isn’t going to reverse thousands of years of history. In the same way that it’s not the strongest, or most aggressive, men who head our countries, companies and rich lists.

Politicians don’t win elections based on whether they could beat their opponents in a fist fight. They have to convince the rest of us via rhetoric that they can govern better than the other options.

So, while the story starts well, it progressively goes off the rails in my eyes, becoming far too extreme. An interesting premise is twisted simply to provide social commentary, rather than providing insight into how that world might look.

It was an enjoyable read, fast-paced and action packed and, at times, a real page turner. Just don’t get too caught up with the flaws.

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Reviewed: 16th August 2019